Saving ElectricityToronto, Ontario --- (METERING.COM) --- October 17, 2006 – Toronto Hydro-Electric System Limited’s Summer Challenge program is starting to reflect positive results. Based on meter readings reviewed to date, 31,876 Torontonians ‘took the summer challenge’ and used less electricity compared to a typical summer; 18,235 of the utility’s customers achieved their 10 per cent benchmark.

Based on this preliminary data, the company estimates that 100,000 customers (20 per cent of eligible customers) will have met their 10 per cent target by the time all meter readings are complete in late November.

Those who used at least 10 per cent less electricity from July 15 - September 15 have not only reduced their hydro bills – they are also getting an additional 10 per cent credit from Toronto Hydro. For the first week of readings, the average electricity savings per customer who reached the 10 per cent target over the program period was approximately 376 kWh or 18.8 per cent per month.

Under the Summer Challenge these 18,235 customers have collectively saved more than 10,500,000 kWh to date – equivalent to approximately 1000 homes being taken off the grid for that period. Toronto Hydro has credited approximately $400,000 to its customers in the first week of mailing out credits on the fall hydro bills. The company estimates that total credits could amount to $2.5 million, based on a 20 per cent achievement rate.

“These results prove that conservation can play a significant role in addressing the Province’s and Toronto’s electricity supply issues,” says David O’Brien, Toronto Hydro Corporation president and CEO. “Considering that approximately 20 per cent of our customers will have answered the call in just two short months and hit the target, we are thrilled by these numbers.”

Toronto Hydro reads approximately 85,000 meters each week and has a total of 670,000 customers. Under the Summer Challenge program, approximately 500,000 residential and small commercial customers were eligible for the program, which was made possible through funding from provincial government for conservation programs across the province.