ZIV wins deal for data concentrators
Edge intelligence: There is a current trend toward the move of data intelligence from the utility control centre to the edge of the grid, observes Jonathan Spencer Jones, content analyst at Engerati
According to Fierce Energy, Verizon has conducted Grid Wide in a pilot with several utilities over the past year and has been testing the technology and the per-month, per-meter cost basis business model.
According to Fierce Energy, Verizon has conducted Grid Wide smart energy platform in a pilot with several utilities over the past year and has been testing the technology and the per-month, per-meter cost basis business model.

US broadband and telecommunications company Verizon has launched a smart energy-as-a-service platform that will help investor-owned, cooperative and municipal utilities to modernise their infrastructure.

The smart energy-as-a-service platform known as 'Grid Wide Utility Solutions' supports cloud-based applications intended to help utility companies drive incremental revenue, reduce operating costs, increase efficiency and improve the customer experience.

The New York-based telecommunications company said the as-a-service model eliminates the need for utilities to design their own managed software solutions and do not need to replace existing energy meters.

The GridWide smart energy platform allows utilities to go further than just remote meter reading. According to Fierce Energy, the platform “lets utilities turn meters into "power-quality" sensors to help them understand the quality of the electricity they are delivering.”

Cloud technology

The smart energy platform can be used to send smart meter data over Verizon’s wireless network, through its private network and then to Verizon's cloud environment.

GridWide offers utilities analytics dashboards to gather updated information on outages and abnormal usage patterns.

Further to this , when a power outage occurs - the smart meter communication card, using the stored energy on the circuit board and the Verizon’s LTE technology, will relay the information enabling utilities to pinpoint each outage and see how widespread it is.

Utility companies can also remotely disconnect and connect service, and avoid send out maintenance workers to address the grid malfunction.

Commenting on the slow uptake of grid digitization technologies, Jay Olearain, Verizon's director of business development for energy and utilities said, "they [utilities] are riding out earlier investments and minimizing expenses" and that that "is one of the biggest challenges in the utilities space today."