Smart water management

Global smart water management company SUEZ has been signed by the town of Putnam, in Windham County, Connecticut to manage its water and wastewater systems.Under the US$30m contract, the company will manage the town’s water network consisting of a 7.6 millions of gallons per day (mgd) wastewater treatment facility and its collection system, 10 sewerage pump stations and 88.6 miles of its sewer main.

In addition, SUEZ will operate and maintain Putnam’s water system comprising 10 wells providing 1.1 mgd a day to the community, two storage tanks, approximately 250 fire hydrants, 750 valves and 38 miles of its water main.

The water management companies are also targeting the deployment of smart water meters within the project’s first 18 months to reduce leaks and ensure accurate water billing.

The project falls under the town’s plan to invest more than US$40m to improve its water infrastructure.

Commenting on the development, Jim Shaw, Chairman of the Putnam Water Pollution Control Authority, said: “This partnership is a proven way to operate efficiently, ensure adequate water supplies, achieve compliance with environmental rules, enhance water service provision, and improve our water and wastewater infrastructure.”

Smart water technologies in the US

The deal follows April's launch of a new smart water mapping and work management technology by Global IT company Trimble to help utilities manage their assets.

In a press statement, the company said its new solution 'Trimble Unity 3.0' is a cloud-based GIS centric Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) platform for smart water management.[ComEd and Illinois utility collaborate on smart water meter pilot]

By using the solution, the US-based company claims that utilities will optimise their operations through improved grid asset monitoring achieved through the firm’s GNSS mapping technology integrated in the technology.

[quote] The solution allows utilities to monitor real time operations, deploy smart meters, as well as quickly attend to leaks to reduce non-revenue water, explains the statement.

The integration will allow functionalities such as simplified connection between mobile workers and a company's headquarters, to access maps and data from back office enterprise systems even when their devices are disconnected from a wireless data network.

"Although our water industry customers face similar challenges, we see them using a variety of unique business processes and approaches for managing their work and resources," said Rami Naber, product manager for Trimble Water.

The solution leverages the EsriGIS technology across devices such as iPhones, iPads, Windows and Android smartphones supporting EsriGIS mapping.

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