microgrid

Options to take part in energy trading markets are limited but a new option is emerging which may change that, writes Jonathan Spencer Jones, content analyst at Engerati[quote] Based on the same technology as the bitcoin, blockchain trading is starting to be tested for peer to peer trading of solar energy between neighbours in the Brooklyn microgrid in New York. [Blockchain Transactive Grid Set To Disrupt Energy Trading Market] By its nature a microgrid makes a good testing ground but the technology needn’t be restricted to that and it is considered to have particular potential in developing countries where electrification is taking place. But no matter where it finds application it will bring a new dimension to the energy trading space.

The microgrid in DERMS

As distributed energy resource penetration escalates, utilities are being forced to adopt Distributed Energy Resources Management Solutions (DERMS) in order to maintain grid stability. One such company, Arizona Public Service, has been investigating and finds that a DERMS can lead to a number of positive and innovative changes in its business models. The company is currently putting in a rooftop solar and two microgrid testbeds with which it plans to study the impacts on the grid and gain further insights into customers’ needs. [Arizona Public Service Captures Opportunities in Distributed Resources Space]

Smart meter analytics

As countries proceed with their smart meter rollouts increasingly they are looking at the requirements at both utility and national levels for a central data hub. In an interview with Engerati, Matthew Ross from Energyworx describes how a central data hub can help utilities meet their data collection and analytics requirements and presentment to customers without compromising its security. [The Data Hub -Unlimited Possibilities] Utilities are then able to concentrate on their core business while also building customer loyalty.

Energy storage in the US

To secure a snapshot of the status of energy storage globally, take a look at the US DOE’s growing database, currently detailing 1,500 projects amounting to 187,361MW of storage. [Storage A Global Technology] With projects dating back to the early 1900s it contains a wealth of information. But its completeness depends to a large extent on project developers and owners who are invited to submit their projects.

 

Image credit: www.newscientist.com