Ralph LaRossa,
President & COO,
PSE&G
 
Newark, NJ, U.S.A. --- (METERING.COM) --- June 24, 2008 – U.S. utility Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE&G) has unveiled a new program designed to curb customers' energy consumption, resulting in lower customer bills and a meaningful reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. This is the first proposal of its kind to be filed under New Jersey's new legislation that addresses regional greenhouse gases – the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) legislation, which encourages utilities to invest in conservation and energy efficiency programs as part of its regulated business.

"The RGGI legislation rightly recognizes the important role utilities like PSE&G can play in helping customers use energy more efficiently," said Ralph LaRossa, PSE&G president and COO. "It's clear that meeting our state's goals to reduce harmful carbon emissions will take more than just talking about conservation. We need to give customers -- especially those in our urban centers -- greater direct access to energy-saving tools and information that will lead to concrete, meaningful reductions."

Through a number of small-scale sub-programs, the company will provide energy-saving measures such as home energy audits, programmable thermostats, attic insulation and high-efficiency lighting upgrades to about 30,000 residential and business customers. The proposal, if approved by the BPU, will enable the utility and regulators to determine the best way to implement broader initiatives to reach the state's aggressive carbon reduction goals.

The filing follows BPU approval earlier this month of the company's proposal to test advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) technologies in three Passaic County towns. If deployed in the future, AMI would enable customers to monitor and reduce their energy use, eliminating carbon emissions and lowering their costs during periods of peak electric demand. PSE&G will install advanced meters in 17,500 homes and businesses in Wayne, Totowa and Paterson beginning this fall.