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IoT
The two semiconductor industry groups warn that without the needed preparation for a ‘deluge of data’, the US has the potential of falling behind other countries currently engaged in research activities.

In the US, trade and lobbying group for the Semiconductor Industry Association and technology research consortium Semiconductor Research Corporation, have called for a US$500m initiative in preparation for the influx of data as a result of the burgeoning IoT industry.

The two semiconductor industry groups warn that without the needed preparation for a ‘deluge of data’, the US has the potential of falling behind other countries currently engaged in research activities.

Commenting on the proliferation of networked IoT devices and the data harnessed from millions of sensors, Ken Hansen, president of the nonprofit Semiconductor Research Corp said: "[IoT devices/gadgets] orders of magnitude larger and more complex than anything we know today."

IoT “Call to Action”

The trade association and research consortium put forth a “Call to Action” to address the torrent of data expected to follow with the deployment of millions of connected devices.

According to San Jose Mercury News, implementers of IoT are ‘confronted with the huge energy demands to compute all that information [raw data]’. It adds that “Call to Action” asks for a “radical” improvement in the energy efficiency of computing.

The initiative is aimed at doing research into intelligent storage, communications, energy-efficient computing, sensing and "insight computing."

Dustin Todd of the semiconductor association said: "We don't have the capacity to store everything that's coming out of the Internet of Things.

"We don't have the communications infrastructure, and we probably don't even have the manufacturing techniques."

Both groups predict that the total mass of silicon wafers to store all of it [data] would exceed the total available silicon supply, the report said.

They said: “The time it would take to transmit all the world's stored data would rise from one year in 2014 to 20 years by 2040.”

Celia Merzbacher, a vice president of the Semiconductor Research Corp commented: "The Internet of Things is already here in some sense.

"A lot of devices are being interconnected, but in order to take that and realize the full benefit and potential, there needs to be much more advanced technology developed in everything from the sensors that collect everything to communications technologies, security and privacy."