E.ON clean energy in illinois

German utilities company E.ON announced that its US subsidiary has kickstarted a clean energy project in the state of Illinois.In a press statement, the firm said its Chicago based division started the installation of 278MW wind farm in Macon County.

The project falls under the company’s efforts to increase its renewable energy portfolio.

The completion of the wind farm by the end of 2017 will increase the firm’s wind energy portfolio in Illinois to 578MW. In the whole of the US, the firm is currently operating 3.1GW of renewable energy sourced from solar and wind.

The wind farm is E.ON’s third wind energy generating plant in the US state and is expected to power more than 180,000 Illinois homes.

Clean energy storage development

Apart from increasing its clean energy portfolio, the company is also partnering with other utility companies in helping them to lift their renewable energy generation by providing them with platforms to store generated electricity.

[quote] In late July, E.ON Climate and Renewables North America signed a deal with Tucson Electric Power to provide frequency response and voltage control from a grid-scale storage facility.
The 10MW battery energy storage facility with a 2MW solar array will be located adjacent to the University of Arizona Science and Technology Park southeast of Tucson. [E.ON to list power generation subsidiary in September].
In mid-May, in the UK, the firm launched a pilot project to understand how its commercial and industrial customers can benefit from solar generation and battery storage.

The utility company partnered with energy storage company RedT Energy for the rollout of the project in Somerset in South West England.

The London-based energy storage solutions provider supplied E.ON with its battery storage technology.

The 4KW battery storage system will be used by JB Wheaton to store power generated from its on-site 3.5MW solar panel during the day and from the grid during off-peak demand periods for use during on-peak demand periods.
Image credit: www.dangerousintersection.org.