Washington, DC, U.S.A. --- (METERING.COM) --- October 8, 2008 - California tops the list of U.S. states employing energy efficiency as the "first fuel" to grow their economies while meeting electricity demand, combating global warming, and contributing to national energy security, according to a new report from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE).

In second place is Oregon, followed by Connecticut, Vermont and New York. Washington, Minnesota, Massachusetts, Wisconsin and New Jersey round out the top ten.

The 2008 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard rates and ranks state-level action on model energy efficiency policies, programs, and practices in eight areas – utility sector and public benefits efficiency, transportation and land use, building energy codes, combined heat and power, appliance efficiency standards, energy efficiency in public buildings and fleets, research, development, and deployment, and financial incentives for efficient technologies.

The top ten states lead the country in energy efficiency through best practices in most of these eight categories. For example all rank in the top ten of the utility and public benefits programs and policies chapter, while five of them rank highest with regards to building energy codes.
 
The "most improved" state since the first state scorecard report in 2006 is Idaho, moving up to 13th place from 25th previously, while Florida moved up to 19th from 29th and Maryland to 12th from 20th. These states have each expanded their efforts through various means, such as committing more resources to energy efficiency programs, setting long term and aggressive energy savings goals, or making commitments to improve the efficiency of their own facilities.

“The top ranked states are demonstrating great leadership in promoting energy independence with cost effective energy efficiency investments,” said Maggie Eldridge, Research Associate at ACEEE and lead author of the report. “We applaud these leading states for embracing a wide range of the proven-effective and readily-available efficiency strategies that will most quickly move our nation closer to energy independence to the benefit of our economy, environment, and national security.”