Brussels, Belgium --- (METERING.COM) --- September 16, 2013 - Smart metering progresses in Europe, with rollouts completed, under way and yet to start, according to the Council of European Energy Regulators’ (CEER) latest status review.

The review covers responses from 23 of the 30 national regulatory authority members of CEER.

Based on these, for electric smart metering in Europe (and excluding trial activities) as of January 1, 2013:

  • 2 countries had completed rollouts – Italy, Sweden
  • 5 countries had rollouts under way – Austria, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Spain
  • 8 countries had made a formal decision to proceed with rollouts – France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Romania
  • 3 countries hadn’t made a formal decision but are planning rollouts – Cyprus, Poland, Slovenia
  • 2 countries had made a formal decision not to proceed with obligatory rollout – Belgium, Czech Republic
  • 3 countries had no plans currently – Iceland, Lithuania, Portugal.

For gas smart metering:

  • No country had yet completed a rollout
  • 1 country had a rollout under way – Italy
  • 6 countries had made a formal decision to proceed with rollouts – Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Romania
  • 2 countries hadn’t made a formal decision but are planning rollouts – France, Slovenia
  • 4 countries had made a formal decision not to proceed with obligatory rollout – Belgium, Czech Republic, Spain, Sweden
  • 7 countries had no plans currently – Austria, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal.

All but one of the rollouts are targeting 80 percent or more of consumers, except for Germany’s smart electric metering rollout which will target 15 percent.

Among other findings of the review are that the technical design of smart metering systems varies from one country to another. Generally, there is a common understanding of what capabilities a smart meter should have but often a subset of these capabilities is chosen for a rollout, as suits the country’s market arrangements and associated cost-benefit analysis.

CEER says it recognizes that despite the many years of assessing European standards, Europe unfortunately still faces a situation without a common standard for smart meters, as well as a lack of interoperability. This leads to a lack of economies of scale and innovation in customer services as smart metering should act as an enabler of additional services.