Bill Kyte, EURELECTRIC’s
chief advisor on
international climate
policy
 
Copenhagen, Denmark --- (METERING.COM) --- December 18, 2009 - Major reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases from the deployment of smart grids and other new technologies are likely to occur in the 2025 to 2040 period, with only limited reductions before 2020, according to a new roadmap for a low carbon power sector by 2050 released at the COP15 climate change meeting in Copenhagen.

The roadmap, from five electricity associations in Australia, Canada, Europe, Japan and the U.S. together with EPRI, finds that it is possible to deliver low carbon power by 2050 through intelligent and efficient electricity generation, transmission, distribution and use, provided that policy action is taken to incentivize very substantial investment in technologies including smart grids, the rollout of electric vehicles, large"scale uptake of renewable energies, and widespread energy efficiency in the economy and society.

However, because of the transition period for deployment of new technologies, the major reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases will occur only from 2025 onwards – after the 2020 deadline for meeting climate targets.

“Electricity can be the solution to climate change and analysis has shown that it is possible to deliver low carbon power by 2050,” commented Bill Kyte, EURELECTRIC’s chief advisor on international climate policy. “However, the current political timeframe lacks recognition of the critical timing for commercial deployment of low carbon technologies.”

The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) indicated that, in order to stabilize atmospheric CO2 emissions within a 2°C rise, global emissions would have to fall by 50 percent on current levels and that the OECD countries would have to reduce their emissions by 60-80 percent. This implies that the power sector in the OECD would have to be the major contributor to a low carbon society by 2050.

The contributors to the report were the Energy Supply Association of Australia, Canadian Electricity Association, EURELECTRIC, Federation of Electric Power Companies of Japan and Edison Electric Institute.