Paris, France and Canberra, Australia --- (METERING.COM) --- April 13, 2010 - The Renault-Nissan Alliance has signed agreements with partners to develop electric mobility in Italy, Spain, Latin America and Australia.

A memorandum of understanding with Enel and Endesa covers a range of issues, including analysis of the technical integration, i.e. power interface, safety, and communications protocol, between Renault and Nissan's electric vehicles and Enel’s recharging infrastructure, and analysis of various recharging technologies and the services associated to the charging infrastructure.

There also will be joint evaluation for the development of pilot projects in areas to be identified in Italy, Spain and Latin America.

A separate agreement with the government of the Australian Capital Territory is aimed at forming a partnership to explore the development of an electric vehicle program and to identify potential areas of cooperation in promoting the use of such vehicles in the Territory.

Renault and Nissan are strongly engaged in the development of electric vehicles and oriented towards mass commercialization of zero emission mobility, as a sustainable mobility solution for the near future, a statement from the companies says. Between 2011 and 2012, Renault will launch a range of four electric vehicles, the urban vehicle Twizy Z.E., the compact hatchback Zoe Z.E., the family hatchback Fluence Z.E. and the light commercial vehicle Kangoo Z.E., while in late 2010, Nissan will launch Leaf as an affordable all electric vehicle for the global mass market. Sales will begin in the US, Japan and select markets in Europe before global mass marketing in 2012.

Recently Nissan, along with other Japanese car makers Toyota and Mitsubishi Motors as well as Fuji Heavy Industries and the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), established the CHAdeMO Association in order to standardize and promote the deployment of quick charger installations for electric vehicles worldwide.

"CHAdeMO" is an abbreviation of "CHArge de MOve", equivalent to "charge for moving", and is a pun on the Japanese "O cha demo ikaga desuka, " which means "Let’s have a tea while charging."