The Milano PILOT was developed under the large initiative of Campus Sostenibile, a project that aims to transform the Politecnico of Milan into a sustainable organization
The Milano PILOT was developed under the large initiative of Campus Sostenibile, a project that aims to transform the Politecnico of Milan into a sustainable organization

A Europe-wide Smart Campus project, aimed at energy efficiency in non-residential university buildings, has reached 30% in energy savings through the use of ICT, Living Lab methodologies and gamification to promote user behavior transformation on public building users.

The overarching goal of the three-year Smart Campus project was to achieve a significant reduction in energy consumption, through the development and installation of ICT based services at pilot buildings in four European universities located in Lisbon, Helsinki, Luleå and Milan.

ICT services were integrated with the energy management systems present in the pilot buildings and provide guidance that will lead to user behaviour transformation towards more energy efficient practices.

This drove a bi-directional learning process whereby the university students/users learn how to interact with the building and the building learns how to interact with the user in a more energy efficient manner.

The service implemented at the four campus sites was also used to educate, influence and sustain behavioural changes through users gaining access to real time interactive information (simulation) and guided/influenced decision making (usage profile modelling and negotiation).

The Smart Campus project, comprised nine consortium partners which included Nordics-based Enoro, a utility software solutions provider, which provided its centralized meter data management (MDM) Generis platform to collect the energy consumption data from the pilot campuses, validate it and provide the campuses with feedback on how the forecast compared to the actual results.

Shared success

The MDM platform was integrated with several different metering systems as part of the Smart Campus pilots. The project achieved energy savings in different locations (Lisbon, Helsinki, Luleå and Milan) and with different test scenarios.

Results of the project revealed that in Luleå, Sweden, over 20% energy was saved in office space and car heater experiments. In Lisbon, Portugal, new applications were created that allowed students to vote for the kind of lighting and temperature conditions selected in the campus areas.

In Helsinki, Finland, the pilot successfully tested several lighting scenarios leading to energy saving investment plans. The pilot also resulted in around 20 percent savings by training the kitchen staff.

After the use of automated system sensors, involvement from the campus community and implementation of new smart solutions, the Milan pilot in Italy resulted in savings from 30% up to 60% in heating, HVAC and lighting scenarios.