ev infrastructure
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The Vancouver City Council will vote this week to amend a bylaw amendment that would require all parking spots in new condos to be equipped for electric vehicle (EV) charging.

If the law is approved, developers will be required to install EV charging points in all new residential building parking bays, with the exclusion of visitor parking areas.

“Our goal is to be 100% renewably powered by 2050 but we can’t do it without providing the infrastructure people need in order to make the transition to electric vehicles cost-effective and practical,” said Mayor Gregor Robertson.

According to Robertson, Vancouver has one of the largest public charging networks. The city’s municipal fleet of vehicles includes 30 EVs and currently there are 70 charging stations across the city.

EV sales have increased 70% year-on-year since 2011, putting pressure on the city to increase the required charging infrastructure.

In 2009, Vancouver began requiring that new residential and commercial buildings be equipped with EV infrastructure. Currently 20% of parking bays in multi-unit residential buildings have charging points. Only 10% of commercial parking bays have access to charging.

More recently, the city approved a curb-side EV charging pilot for commercial businesses and single-family homes where off-street parking is not accessible. The project is part of efforts to reduce the city’s carbon footprint, with transportation accounting for 41% of emissions.

The vote will go to council on Wednesday for a decision.

The bylaw is part of a larger drive by the Canadian government to support the development and installation of smart grid infrastructure across the country.

The government of Canada, through the Ministry of Natural Resources, this year announced $100 million in funding towards the development of smart grids.

The funds are being sourced from a $21.9 billion 2017 budget set aside for the development of smart energy infrastructure through the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Energy and Climate Change.

Click here for the full story on Canada's smart grid investment.